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from category archives: #asianow

journal of asian studies

japan’s liberal-democratic paradox of refugee admission: a q&a with konrad kalicki

konrad kalicki is an assistant professor in the department of japanese studies and department of political science at the national university of singapore. he is author of “japan's liberal-democratic paradox of refugee admission,” which appears in the may 2019 issue of the journal of asian studies. in the interview below, conducted by rajit mazumder (depaul university), kalicki discusses his research on japanese refugee policy and how civil society efforts might offer an alternative pathway to resettlement for refugees seeking sanctuary in japan.aas members can read the jas online at cambridge core by first logging into their member accounts at the aas website and then selecting “access the journal of asian studies” in the right-hand menu on their member homepage.could i begin by asking about the article’s classification of “refugees” as a “special category of international migrants”? “migrants” are presumed to be moving voluntarily ...

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agrarian labor, caste, and the limits of conversion: a conversation with navyug gill

historian navyug gill, assistant professor at william paterson university, recently published an article, “limits of conversion: caste, labor, and the question of emancipation in colonial panjab,” in the journal of asian studies. gill’s research interests include modern south asia, the political economy of caste and labor, and comparative histories of global capitalism. currently he is working on a book manuscript, labors of division: caste, class and the making of agrarian hierarchy in colonial panjab.  in an interview with mukul kumar, an urban geographer based at the university of california, berkeley, gill discusses histories of caste and conversion, agrarian labor and historical materialism, as well as anti-colonial politics and the question of emancipation within the context of colonial panjab.mk: in your article, you discuss the limits of a politics centered on conversion. what are the ways in which the political economy of dalit conversion in colonial panjab reveals the ...

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a new look and other changes at the journal of asian studies

the february 2019 issue of the journal of asian studies has been published and is available online at cambridge core, with free open access until april 15. this is the first issue released under new jas editor vinayak chaturvedi (university of california, irvine), and readers familiar with the jas will immediately notice that the journal has a new look. below, dr. chaturvedi explains the redesign of the journal’s appearance and also answers some other frequently asked questions he has heard in his first eight months as jas editor.for regular updates, please follow the jas on facebook and twitter.what are some changes to the jas?the february 2019 issue of the jas (volume 78.1) introduces a new cover with new colors. the designers at cambridge university press worked hard to come up with a contemporary design with a new font and matte finish. the color of the paper is now white, a change from the earlier ivory color paper. the jas has had three covers in the past—four if you count the or ...

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forgotten geographies in asian studies

by jeffrey wasserstromuc irvine history professor jeffrey wasserstrom recently concluded his ten-year tenure as editor of the journal of asian studies. one of the new practices that wasserstrom introduced as editor was a “jas-at-aas” panel at the annual conference. this year, in a similar spirit, he organized a jas panel for the just-concluded aas-in-asia 2018 conference in new delhi, focused on the theme of “forgotten geographies.” wasserstrom was not able to attend the conference in person but sent the remarks below to be read on his behalf at the start of the session.during my graduate school years in the 1980s, i thought a lot about how disciplines were defined and the borders between them policed. i also thought a lot about what it meant to cross standard dividing lines between periods, for i was interested in issues that played out over all of the twentieth century but scholars of chinese modern history tended to stop at 1949, leaving discussion of later periods to social ...

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